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Medics provide top notch care during Sharpshooter 13-2 exercise

An injured patient lies unconscious on a stretcher while medical personnel evaluate him Feb. 13, 2013, at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho. Medical personnel were tested on a wide variety of issues and problems throughout the Operational Readiness Exercise. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Benjamin Sutton)

An injured patient lies unconscious on a stretcher while medical personnel evaluate him Feb. 13, 2013, at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho. Medical personnel were tested on a wide variety of issues and problems throughout the Operational Readiness Exercise. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Benjamin Sutton)

U.S. Air Force Maj. Kevin Loh, 366th Medical Group flight surgeon and Staff Sgt. Michael Montgomery, 366th MDG medic, coordinate a medical evacuation for patients inside the treatment facility Feb. 13, 2013, at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho. Paperwork is extremely important and must be filled out correctly in order to ensure mission success and patient safety. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Benjamin Sutton)

U.S. Air Force Maj. Kevin Loh, 366th Medical Group flight surgeon and Staff Sgt. Michael Montgomery, 366th MDG medic, coordinate a medical evacuation for patients inside the treatment facility Feb. 13, 2013, at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho. Paperwork is extremely important and must be filled out correctly in order to ensure mission success and patient safety. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Benjamin Sutton)

Medics from the 366th Medical Group are forced to move a patient to the ground and continue care Feb. 13, 2013, at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho. Despite hardships and intense working conditions, these personnel provide excellent care to all patients who come through their door during the Sharpshooter 13-2 exercise. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Benjamin Sutton)

Medics from the 366th Medical Group are forced to move a patient to the ground and continue care Feb. 13, 2013, at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho. Despite hardships and intense working conditions, these personnel provide excellent care to all patients who come through their door during the Sharpshooter 13-2 exercise. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Benjamin Sutton)

MOUNTAIN HOME AIR FORCE BASE, Idaho -- Despite broken bones, cold-weather victims and numerous wounds too gruesome to mention in polite conversation, medical professionals from the 366th Medical Group carry on the task of saving lives and healing wounds during Sharpshooter 13-2.

The exercise has tested the knowledge of the men and women who are working inside the front-line trauma facility.

"No matter what the injury is we provide an excellent level of medical care to every patient who comes through our door," said Maj. Kevin Loh, 366th Medical Group flight surgeon. "We can get a lot of patients if a serious attack has occurred. But our staff is capable and can handle any situation."

With scenarios where attacks are launched randomly throughout Base X, the medics must be prepared for any and every situation.

"All our patients are currently stabilized and are awaiting helicopter rides to the facility where they can have their wounds better treated," said Senior Airman Andy Grimes, 366th Medical Group medic. "We are only a basic trauma center and don't have the resources here to assist people with major surgical procedures.

"However, we have still had multiple patients come through our trauma care center with injuries including gunshot wounds, shrapnel injuries and even a few accidents from the attacks," he continued.

Of course the medics understand that although this is a simulation, stabilizing each and every patient is priority number one.

"Depending on what is wrong with each patient determines how we treat them," said Loh. "Stabilizing them is always a priority and once that is accomplished we address their injuries.

"If we need any extra or specific resources we call our emergency operations center and request it," he continued. "This way we are able to provide excellent care to patients."
Regardless of the situation, medical personnel are sworn to provide expert care to each patient.

"We had to continue our treatment and assessment of our patient on the ground earlier due to incoming attacks from the enemy," said Grimes. "It can be a hassle but the patient's safety is most important and we will do what is necessary to ensure that."

The bottom line for these medical heroes is saving lives and helping to protect the 366th Fighter Wing's most important asset, Gunfighters.

"We are here to help whoever is injured," said Grimes. "It's our job and we are the best at it."

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