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Photos: U-2 Dragon Lady "Anytime, Anyplace"

Staff Sgt. Heather Doyle, 9th Physiological Support Squadron launch and recovery technician, fits a specialized boot to U-2 pilot Capt. Travis, in preparation for a "high flight" at Beale Air Force Base, Calif., Jan. 8, 2013. Since its inception in 1955, the U-2 has required the use of a pressure suit to regulate the pressure for pilots above 50,000 feet. The U-2 is the only aircraft in the Department of Defense inventory that requires the utilization of a full pressure suit. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Drew Buchanan/Released)

Staff Sgt. Heather Doyle, 9th Physiological Support Squadron launch and recovery technician, fits a specialized boot to U-2 pilot Capt. Travis, in preparation for a "high flight" at Beale Air Force Base, Calif., Jan. 8, 2013. Since its inception in 1955, the U-2 has required the use of a pressure suit to regulate the pressure for pilots above 50,000 feet. The U-2 is the only aircraft in the Department of Defense inventory that requires the utilization of a full pressure suit. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Drew Buchanan/Released)

Staff Sgt. Vanessa Jordan (left ) 9th Physiological Support Squadron launch and recovery technician, uses a mirror to confirm placement of U-2 pilot Capt. Travis’ specialized glasses within his helmet as Staff Sgt. Heather Doyle and Senior Airman Meghan Mattingly assist Jan. 8, 2013, at Beale Air Force Base, Calif. Dawning of the highly specialized full pressure suit requires a team of physiological support personnel. The squadron is the only one of its kind in the Department of Defense, with the responsibility of ensuring survivability of the nation's team of U-2 pilots. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Drew Buchanan/Released)

Staff Sgt. Vanessa Jordan (left ) 9th Physiological Support Squadron launch and recovery technician, uses a mirror to confirm placement of U-2 pilot Capt. Travis’ specialized glasses within his helmet as Staff Sgt. Heather Doyle and Senior Airman Meghan Mattingly assist Jan. 8, 2013, at Beale Air Force Base, Calif. Dawning of the highly specialized full pressure suit requires a team of physiological support personnel. The squadron is the only one of its kind in the Department of Defense, with the responsibility of ensuring survivability of the nation's team of U-2 pilots. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Drew Buchanan/Released)

U-2 pilot Capt. Travis dawns the sun visor on his pressure suit helmet during pre-flight suit dawning in preparation for a “high flight” in the U-2 Dragon Lady Jan. 8, 2013, at Beale Air Force Base, Calif. The full pressure suit, developed by the U.S. Air Force has been adopted by NASA and other agencies for use by astronauts and other high altitude crews. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Drew Buchanan/Released)

U-2 pilot Capt. Travis dawns the sun visor on his pressure suit helmet during pre-flight suit dawning in preparation for a “high flight” in the U-2 Dragon Lady Jan. 8, 2013, at Beale Air Force Base, Calif. The full pressure suit, developed by the U.S. Air Force has been adopted by NASA and other agencies for use by astronauts and other high altitude crews. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Drew Buchanan/Released)

U-2 pilot Capt. Travis utilizes a specialized bottle to drink an energy drink prior to flight in a U-2, Jan. 8, 2013, at Beale Air Force Base, Calif. Due to the long duration of flights, U-2 pilots must utilize specialized equipment to drink and eat.  (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Drew Buchanan/Released)

U-2 pilot Capt. Travis utilizes a specialized bottle to drink an energy drink prior to flight in a U-2, Jan. 8, 2013, at Beale Air Force Base, Calif. Due to the long duration of flights, U-2 pilots must utilize specialized equipment to drink and eat. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Drew Buchanan/Released)

U-2 pilot Capt. Travis prepares to exit a physiological support vehicle on the flightline Jan. 8, 2013, at Beale Air Force Base, Calif. Beale is home to the Air Force’s fleet of 33 U-2 high-altitude Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Drew Buchanan/Released)

U-2 pilot Capt. Travis prepares to exit a physiological support vehicle on the flightline Jan. 8, 2013, at Beale Air Force Base, Calif. Beale is home to the Air Force’s fleet of 33 U-2 high-altitude Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Drew Buchanan/Released)

A maintainer from the 9th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron salutes U-2 pilot Capt. Travis as he prepares for a “high flight” in the U-2 Dragon Lady Jan. 8, 2013, at Beale Air Force Base, Calif. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Drew Buchanan/Released)

A maintainer from the 9th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron salutes U-2 pilot Capt. Travis as he prepares for a “high flight” in the U-2 Dragon Lady Jan. 8, 2013, at Beale Air Force Base, Calif. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Drew Buchanan/Released)

U-2 pilot Capt. Travis prepares to enter the cockpit of a U-2 Dragon Lady as Staff Sgt. Heather Doyle assists in the “hook up” of necessary life support systems Jan. 8, 2013, at Beale Air Force Base, Calif. Once situated in the pressurized cockpit, U-2 pilots have a strict limitation of movement due to the full pressure suit and size of the cockpit. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Drew Buchanan/Released)

U-2 pilot Capt. Travis prepares to enter the cockpit of a U-2 Dragon Lady as Staff Sgt. Heather Doyle assists in the “hook up” of necessary life support systems Jan. 8, 2013, at Beale Air Force Base, Calif. Once situated in the pressurized cockpit, U-2 pilots have a strict limitation of movement due to the full pressure suit and size of the cockpit. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Drew Buchanan/Released)

Pilot Capt. Travis checks his heads up display in the cockpit of a U-2 Dragon Lady Jan. 8, 2013, at Beale Air Force Base, Calif. The current model U-2S aircraft features an all-glass, digital cockpit, improved sensors and propulsion systems. The U-2 is a high-altitude/near-space reconnaissance and surveillance aircraft providing signals, imagery, electronic measurements and signature intelligence. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Drew Buchanan/Released)

Pilot Capt. Travis checks his heads up display in the cockpit of a U-2 Dragon Lady Jan. 8, 2013, at Beale Air Force Base, Calif. The current model U-2S aircraft features an all-glass, digital cockpit, improved sensors and propulsion systems. The U-2 is a high-altitude/near-space reconnaissance and surveillance aircraft providing signals, imagery, electronic measurements and signature intelligence. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Drew Buchanan/Released)

A U-2S Dragon Lady prepares to taxi from the Beale Air Force Base flightline Jan. 8, 2013. While the first U-2 was built in 1955, the aircraft has evolved over the nearly 60 years it’s been in service. The current model U-2S models were built in the late 1980s and are over 30 percent larger than the original U-2A.  (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Drew Buchanan/Released)

A U-2S Dragon Lady prepares to taxi from the Beale Air Force Base flightline Jan. 8, 2013. While the first U-2 was built in 1955, the aircraft has evolved over the nearly 60 years it’s been in service. The current model U-2S models were built in the late 1980s and are over 30 percent larger than the original U-2A. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Drew Buchanan/Released)

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