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C-130Js take flight

C-130Js taxi toward the runway during a training exercise Nov. 30, 2012, at Dyess Air Force Base, Texas. The C-130J incorporates state-of-the-art technology to reduce manpower requirements, lower operating and support costs, and provides life-cycle cost savings over earlier C-130 models. Compared to older C-130s, the J model climbs faster and higher, flies farther at a higher cruise speed, and takes off and lands in a shorter distance. Dyess has received 23 J models and is scheduled to get a total of 28, making it the largest C-130J unit in the world. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Richard P. Ebensberger/ Released)

C-130Js taxi toward the runway during a training exercise Nov. 30, 2012, at Dyess Air Force Base, Texas. The C-130J incorporates state-of-the-art technology to reduce manpower requirements, lower operating and support costs, and provides life-cycle cost savings over earlier C-130 models. Compared to older C-130s, the J model climbs faster and higher, flies farther at a higher cruise speed, and takes off and lands in a shorter distance. Dyess has received 23 J models and is scheduled to get a total of 28, making it the largest C-130J unit in the world. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Richard P. Ebensberger/ Released)

C-130Js taxi toward the runway during a training exercise Nov. 30, 2012, at Dyess Air Force Base, Texas. The C-130J incorporates state-of-the-art technology to reduce manpower requirements, lower operating and support costs, and provides life-cycle cost savings over earlier C-130 models. Compared to older C-130s, the J model climbs faster and higher, flies farther at a higher cruise speed, and takes off and lands in a shorter distance. Dyess has received 23 J models and is scheduled to get a total of 28, making it the largest C-130J unit in the world. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Richard P. Ebensberger/ Released)

C-130Js taxi toward the runway during a training exercise Nov. 30, 2012, at Dyess Air Force Base, Texas. The C-130J incorporates state-of-the-art technology to reduce manpower requirements, lower operating and support costs, and provides life-cycle cost savings over earlier C-130 models. Compared to older C-130s, the J model climbs faster and higher, flies farther at a higher cruise speed, and takes off and lands in a shorter distance. Dyess has received 23 J models and is scheduled to get a total of 28, making it the largest C-130J unit in the world. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Richard P. Ebensberger/ Released)

C-130Js taxi toward the runway during a training exercise Nov. 30, 2012, at Dyess Air Force Base, Texas. The C-130J incorporates state-of-the-art technology to reduce manpower requirements, lower operating and support costs, and provides life-cycle cost savings over earlier C-130 models. Compared to older C-130s, the J model climbs faster and higher, flies farther at a higher cruise speed, and takes off and lands in a shorter distance. Dyess has received 23 J models and is scheduled to get a total of 28, making it the largest C-130J unit in the world. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Richard P. Ebensberger/ Released)

C-130Js taxi toward the runway during a training exercise Nov. 30, 2012, at Dyess Air Force Base, Texas. The C-130J incorporates state-of-the-art technology to reduce manpower requirements, lower operating and support costs, and provides life-cycle cost savings over earlier C-130 models. Compared to older C-130s, the J model climbs faster and higher, flies farther at a higher cruise speed, and takes off and lands in a shorter distance. Dyess has received 23 J models and is scheduled to get a total of 28, making it the largest C-130J unit in the world. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Richard P. Ebensberger/ Released)

A C-130J assigned to the 317th Airlift Group takes off during a training exercise Nov. 30, 2012, at Dyess Air Force Base, Texas. The C-130J incorporates state-of-the-art technology to reduce manpower requirements, lower operating and support costs, and provides life-cycle cost savings over earlier C-130 models. Compared to older C-130s, the J model climbs faster and higher, flies farther at a higher cruise speed, and takes off and lands in a shorter distance. Dyess has received 23 J models and is scheduled to get a total of 28, making it the largest C-130J unit in the world. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Richard P. Ebensberger/ Released)

A C-130J assigned to the 317th Airlift Group takes off during a training exercise Nov. 30, 2012, at Dyess Air Force Base, Texas. The C-130J incorporates state-of-the-art technology to reduce manpower requirements, lower operating and support costs, and provides life-cycle cost savings over earlier C-130 models. Compared to older C-130s, the J model climbs faster and higher, flies farther at a higher cruise speed, and takes off and lands in a shorter distance. Dyess has received 23 J models and is scheduled to get a total of 28, making it the largest C-130J unit in the world. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Richard P. Ebensberger/ Released)

Seven C-130Js prepare to take off during a training exercise Nov. 30, 2012, at Dyess Air Force Base, Texas. The C-130J incorporates state-of-the-art technology to reduce manpower requirements, lower operating and support costs, and provides life-cycle cost savings over earlier C-130 models. Compared to older C-130s, the J model climbs faster and higher, flies farther at a higher cruise speed, and takes off and lands in a shorter distance. Dyess has received 23 J models and is scheduled to get a total of 28, making it the largest C-130J unit in the world. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Richard P. Ebensberger/ Released)

Seven C-130Js prepare to take off during a training exercise Nov. 30, 2012, at Dyess Air Force Base, Texas. The C-130J incorporates state-of-the-art technology to reduce manpower requirements, lower operating and support costs, and provides life-cycle cost savings over earlier C-130 models. Compared to older C-130s, the J model climbs faster and higher, flies farther at a higher cruise speed, and takes off and lands in a shorter distance. Dyess has received 23 J models and is scheduled to get a total of 28, making it the largest C-130J unit in the world. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Richard P. Ebensberger/ Released)

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